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DIXIE – Of Mules and Men

February 27, 2013

As many of you are aware, mules are hybrid animals; they are the result of the breeding of a donkey with a horse.  This blending produces exceptional creatures: very intelligent, possessed of extraordinary stamina,  awesome strength and vibrant personalities.  At the same time, their memories are unusually strong, especially with regard to negative experiences.

Here at the DSC, over the years, every mule but one (Reno)  has come  to us from backgrounds of neglect,  misunderstanding and rough treatment..  We have seen too often that mules are bred as an experiment. ” What will happen if we breed our donkey with a horse?”  And what happens is a  foal who  is  alert and possessed from the first with a degree of sensitivity that requires caring, consistent treatment, in a positive atmsophere where there is an absense of  violent responses.  Under such conditions, mules can become exceptional companions, completely devoted to their caregivers.  When those conditions do not obtain, however, it is almost certain that the foal will become fearful, unable to trust humans and always on guard.  The greatest mistake regarding the training of a mule is to approach with the intention of ‘breaking’ its spirit. 

Our newest arrival, Dixie, is a Miniature mule, sired probably by a  pony and a Miniature donkey and she is terrified of harsh sounds, unexpected movements and all humans.  Added to this emotional turmoil is the fact that her hooves had grown for years and years without being trimmed.  They were so long that they curled like horns and Dixie was forced to walk on the sides of her feet.

Since her arrival last week, our farrier, Chris Gerber,  has removed these painful hooves with great skill and patience.  The process has been dangerous: Dixie can be wild with fear.  As a result of these operations, she is able to stand almost normally, now.  We are still very cautious about her future, however, because one foot and leg had been twisted long term  in a debilitating  manner  in her efforts to compensate.  Radiographs will reveal whether the damage is permanent and we think that, in the next few days, Dixie will be able to tolerate without extrene panic this medical procedure.

So there it is, yet another occasion when we are so grateful to have been able to step in and bring relief to a helpless creature’s life.  Dixie has a fine spirit and we will treat her always with the gentleness that she deserves.  Perhaps with time and patience she will learn to forgive humans a little bit but one thing is certain: Dixie will never forget.

Sandra Pady, Founder

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One Comment leave one →
  1. Cindy Crank permalink
    February 27, 2013 4:06 pm

    What a wonderful story that has a happy ending for Dixie thanks to the DSC. When will people learn that you can’t train or break an animal through unkindness and pain. My late donkey Alexandra was fearful of the farrier and he made the problem worse by getting angry at her; the next time he came to visit she was worse and ready for the slap and the shout. I had to train him to treat her differently. My next farrier was kind and gentle and within months she was standing quietly when her hooves were trimmed. One moment of anger can undo months of good.

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